These notes have been compiled to show how the Mr Watt eBooks can be used in conjunction with the 2014 National Curriculum.

These notes are ongoing work; any comments or suggestions are welcomed, and I am very happy to do Mr Watt presentation sheets that will assist your class if you let me know the specifics.

(for example, see the KS1 Maths activity sheets prepared for Hertford Infants, Brighton.)

The text is below, but please email  Jon Mills  if you would like a pdf or Word.doc of these notes to print out.

ks1 docs

 KS1 SCIENCE eBooks 1~4

EVERYDAY MATERIALS
requirement               eBook 1                eBook 2               eBook 3              eBook 4
Pupils should be taught to:Distinguish between an object and the material from which it is made.Identify and name a variety of everyday materials, including wood, plastic, glass, metal, water, and rock.Describe the simple physical properties of a variety of everyday

materials

Compare and group together a variety of everyday materials

on the basis of their simple physical properties

 

Mr.Watt and almost everything in his world, is made of steel.Steel is Iron with a pinch of carbon (0.2-2%) mixed into it.Iron is the 4th most common element in the world ~ 6th in the Universe. The Sun and the stars contain iron – Mars is red because of iron. Early Egyptians used iron found in meteorites; even your body contains iron!Which objects in the stories are made from metal in the real world, and which are not?

What is made of metal in your environment? List all of the things in your classroom and inside and outside your house that are made of metals. Which of these objects are magnetic?

Properties of steel: (low carbon): Malleable (easily shaped); Ductile (easily bent); Strong; Stiff; Magnetic; corrodes

Stainless steel (alloyed with Chromium & Nickel): resistant to corrosion; Hard; sometimes magnetic (depending on alloy mixture)

Properties of Copper: Ductile; Hard; Strong; Tough; Corrosion resistant, non-magnetic; alloys easily, to make Bronze (with tin) and Brass (with zinc); good conductor; naturally anti-bacterial; attractive colour.

Properties of Aluminium: Light; Strong; Malleable; Corrosion resistant; good conductor

.

  Use of everyday materials
Pupils should be taught to: Identify and compare the suitability of a variety of everyday materials, including wood, metal,  plastic, glass, brick, rock, paper and cardboard for particular usesFind out how the shapes of solid objects made from some materials can be changed by squashing, bending, twisting andstretching.

 

Properties of steel: (low carbon): Malleable (easily shaped); Ductile (easily bent); Strong; Stiff; Magnetic; corrodes; cheap.Uses: Car bodies & engines; Fridges & Appliances; Radiators; Table & chair legs; building structures; gates & railings; lampposts; general brackets & ironmongery; garden toolsStainless steel (alloyed with Chromium & Nickel): resistant to corrosion.

Uses: Cutlery; Sinks; Marine fixtures & fixings on ships & boats and exposed conditions;

Properties of Copper: Ductile; Hard; Strong; Tough; Corrosion resistant, non-magnetic; alloys easily to make Bronze (with tin) and Brass (with zinc); good conductor; naturally anti-bacterial; attractive colour; easily recycled.

Uses: Plumbing pipes; tools; weapons; jewellry; coins; door furniture; brewing equipment; hospital apparatus; Mr. Watt’s Sun (eBook3 P38); Mr.Watt’s airplane propellers (eBook1 P.35).

The train’s dome is made from brass (eBook1 P.9)

Properties of Aluminium: Light; Strong; Malleable; Corrosion resistant; good conductor

Uses: Airplanes; cars; ladders; greenhouses; saucepans; drinks cans; roofing; cookers; overhead power cables. Pop-rivets (see one being used in the joining video, Book1. P48)

Watch a selection of the making videos.

See how a hammer is used to squash hot steel eBook2 P25.

Look out for twisting hot metal when Mr.Watt’s pie crust is made: eBook3 P3

See the train track being bent in ebook1 P6

 

One response »

  1. Pingback: Mr Watt’s Key Stage 1 notes (all subjects) | mrwatt'sblog

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